Posts Tagged ‘Forgiveness’

The True Meaning of Christmas

Wednesday, December 25th, 2013

Today is Christmas Day. We all like Christmas. A day of  gifts and  overeating. A day with no work except for those  in  service businesses. A time to reflect 2122063264_b9b35d91d5_zand look back on the previous year and forward to the next.

As a child I always looked forward to Christmas. We had stockings, a tree, lots of brightly  wrapped presents. I never even realized we were jewish until I was a teenager and we occassionaly  celebrated  Hanakkah as well. Hanakkah was ok but  never had the attraction for me that Christmas did.

I think I was six before I learned that Santa was not real.  We put the cookies out for him and even the milk. It was really exciting to me and I was amazed at the miracle of the presents appearing as if by magic. Of course as I grew older I started to catch on and even found the closet where the presents were being stored. Didn’t really change my enthusiasm or appreciation for the time of year and the  occasion. I was living on the east coast and more often than not we did have a white Christmas with lots of snow and  the opportunity to stay indoors and play with our new toys. (more…)

Mandela and Malala

Monday, December 9th, 2013

Nelson Mandela died last Thursday.  By any standards Mandela was a great human being whose life symbolizes the true Nelson_Mandela-2008_(edit)meaning of success.

Nelson Mandela was not a perfect human being. He was married three times and divorced twice. I am sure that in his youth he may have had to take actions which incorporated qualities of anger and frustration, perhaps even violence. In many ways the life of Mandela is a case study of how a strong leader needs to embrace both masculine and feminine qualities. Without the fierce strength and perhaps even aggression of his youth, Mandela would not have been in a position to show the power of forgiveness in solidifying lasting change. As Nelson Mandela learned the true nature of balance in his personal and political life, he was able to achieve lasting results which were truly extraordinary.

More than any other statesman, Nelson Mandela represented unity and overcoming separatism. Those who knew Mandela personally felt he exuded the quality of love. Certainly the photographs from his later life show a man who was able to smile and laugh and enjoy the quiet moments of life. That he was fearless in confronting those who abused and mistreated him and his people, and that he was able to genuinely forgive those  who sometimes hated him and his purpose, made him a unique and admirable leader and human being.

I see many of these same qualities of balancing male and female energy in Malala. Malala was born when Mandela was already 79 years old.  Many years will have to pass before we are able to determine how significant a role Malala will have on the world stage, but whatever her role the lesson we can learn is that fearlessness for one’s personal safety, dedication to a larger purpose based on simple justice, human decency, and the willingness to remain true to one’s roots and family are qualities both of these larger than life personalities share.

Nelson Mandela was the son of a tribal chief. Malala is the daughter of a school teacher. In neither case were these families positioned to create great world leaders. That is exactly the point. No matter who you are, no matter who your parents, grandparents or relatives may be, you are potentially a great world leader. What impact you have on the world may never be formally recognized in the way that Nelson Mandela and Malala have been recognized, but the impact of your life may be just as great.

Everyone matters, everyone can contribute. We can create a just and peaceful world with opportunity for all. The life of Nelson Mandela confirms this truth. We salute a great soul whose journey no doubt continues at this time to contribute to the intended joy of all creation.

Synchronicity and Forgiveness

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

Synchronicity is a term used by Karl Jung to describe events which seem to be coincidences but actually are patterns that are often remarkable and rarely just coincidences. In my experience the universe is constantly trying to tell us where to go, what to do and who we really are. In my novel The Twelve, synchronicities were at the heart of the story and synchronicities are key to events in my own life. Examples can be dramatic or not, but by paying attention we can see and be more than we sometimes perceive. (more…)